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Shared Familial Risk Between Bulimic Symptoms and Alcohol Involvement During Adolescence
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, United States.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6851-3297
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, ISSN 0021-843X, E-ISSN 1939-1846, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 506-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twin studies show the established relation between bulimic symptoms and problematic alcohol involvement in adult females is partly due to shared familial factors, specifically shared genetic effects. However, it is unclear if similar shared etiological factors exist during adolescence or in males. We examined the familial overlap (i.e., genetic and common environmental correlations) between bulimic symptoms and various levels of alcohol involvement in 16- to 17-year-old female and male same-sex twin pairs using sex-specific biometrical twin modeling. Bulimic symptoms were assessed with the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. Alcohol involvement included alcohol use in the last month, having ever been intoxicated, and alcohol intoxication frequency. Results revealed 3 distinct patterns. First, in general, phenotypic correlations indicated statistically similar associations between bulimic symptoms and alcohol involvement in girls and boys. Second, common environmental overlap was significant for the bivariate associations including having ever been intoxicated. Third, moderate genetic correlations were observed between all bulimic symptoms and alcohol involvement in girls and moderate common environmental correlations were observed in boys for the more risky/deviant levels of involvement. Similar to adults, there is familial overlap between bulimic symptoms and alcohol involvement in adolescent girls and boys. These results could inform symptom-and sex-specific, developmentally targeted prevention and intervention programs for the comorbidity between bulimic symptoms and alcohol involvement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association , 2017. Vol. 126, no 5, p. 506-518
Keywords [en]
bulimia nervosa, bulimic symptoms, alcohol use, comorbidity, and twin study
National Category
Psychology Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-58932DOI: 10.1037/abn0000268ISI: 000404972000004PubMedID: 28691841Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85022178889OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-58932DiVA, id: diva2:1134745
Note

Funding Agency:

NIH  K01MH106675

Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Henrik

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