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Comparison of the SALT and Smart triage systems using a virtual reality simulator with paramedic students
Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.
Department of Clinical Research and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 18, no 6, 314-321 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Virtual reality systems may allow for organized study of mass casualty triage systems by allowing investigators to replicate the same mass casualty incident, with the same victims, for a large number of rescuers. The study objectives were to develop such a virtual reality system, and use it to assess the ability of trained paramedic students to triage simulated victims using two triage systems.

METHODS: Investigators created 25 patient scenarios for a highway bus crash in a virtual reality simulation system. Paramedic students were trained to proficiency on the new 'Sort, Assess, Life saving interventions, Treat and Transport (SALT)' triage system, and 22 students ran the simulation, applying the SALT algorithm to each victim. After a 3-month washout period, the students were retrained on the 'Smart' triage system, and each student ran the same crash simulation using the Smart system. Data inputs were recorded by the simulation software and analyzed with the paired t-tests.

RESULTS: The students had a mean triage accuracy of 70.0% with SALT versus 93.0% with Smart (P=0.0001). Mean overtriage was 6.8% with SALT versus 1.8% with Smart (P=0.0015), and mean undertriage was 23.2% with SALT versus 5.1% with Smart (P=0.0001). The average time for a student to triage the scene was 21 min 3 s for SALT versus 11 min 59 s for Smart (P=0.0001).

CONCLUSION: The virtual reality platform seems to be a viable research tool for examining mass casualty triage. A small sample of trained paramedic students using the virtual reality system was able to triage simulated patients faster and with greater accuracy with 'Smart' triage than with 'SALT' triage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011. Vol. 18, no 6, 314-321 p.
Keyword [en]
disaster planning; emergency medical services; emergency medical technicians; triage
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59275DOI: 10.1097/MEJ.0b013e328345d6fdISI: 000296723000002PubMedID: 21451414Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80455137219OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-59275DiVA: diva2:1135585
Note

Funding Agencies:

Laerdal Foundation for Acute Medicine  2397 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  200-2004-M-23468 

Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden

Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Kurland, Lisa

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