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Gaze-based assistive technology in daily activities in children with severe physical impairments: an intervention study
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Women´s and Children´s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth WA, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne VIC, Australia; Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre (UHL), County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
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2017 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To establish the impact of a gaze-based assistive technology (AT) intervention on activity repertoire, autonomous use, and goal attainment in children with severe physical impairments, and to examine parents’ satisfaction with the gaze-based AT and with services related to the gaze-based AT intervention.

Methods: Non-experimental multiple case study with before, after, and follow-up design. Ten children with severe physical impairments without speaking ability (aged 1–15 years) participated in gaze-based AT intervention for 9–10 months, during which period the gaze-based AT was implemented in daily activities.

Results: Repertoire of computer activities increased for seven children. All children had sustained usage of gaze-based AT in daily activities at follow-up, all had attained goals, and parents’ satisfaction with the AT and with services was high.

Discussion: The gaze-based AT intervention was effective in guiding parents and teachers to continue supporting the children to perform activities with the AT after the intervention program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis , 2017. Vol. 20, no 3, p. 129-141
Keywords [en]
Cerebral palsy, computer activities, eye-tracking technology, goal achievement, self-help devices
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Occupational Therapy Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60615DOI: 10.3109/17518423.2015.1132281ISI: 000399489800003PubMedID: 26930111Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84961199407OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-60615DiVA, id: diva2:1138376
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Jimmy Dahlstens Fond

Stiftelsen Sunnerdahls Handikappfond

Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2017-09-05 Last updated: 2018-08-05Bibliographically approved

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Borgestig, Maria

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