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Eye gaze performance for children with severe physical impairments using gaze-based assistive technology: a longitudinal study
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre and Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth WA, Australia.
School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University & Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, UHL, County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
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2016 (English)In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gaze-based assistive technology (gaze-based AT) has the potential to provide children affected by severe physical impairments with opportunities for communication and activities. This study aimed to examine changes in eye gaze performance over time (time on task and accuracy) in children with severe physical impairments, without speaking ability, using gaze-based AT. A longitudinal study with an AB design was conducted on ten children (aged 1–15 years) with severe physical impairments, who were beginners to gaze-based AT at baseline. Thereafter, all children used the gaze-based AT in daily activities over the course of the study. Compass computer software was used to measure time on task and accuracy with eye selection of targets on screen, and tests were performed with the children at baseline, after 5 months, 9–11 months, and after 15–20 months. Findings showed that the children improved in time on task after 5 months and became more accurate in selecting targets after 15–20 months. This study indicates that these children with severe physical impairments, who were unable to speak, could improve in eye gaze performance. However, the children needed time to practice on a long-term basis to acquire skills needed to develop fast and accurate eye gaze performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2016. Vol. 28, no 2, p. 93-102
Keywords [en]
assistive devices, computer access, physical disability
National Category
Pediatrics Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60616DOI: 10.1080/10400435.2015.1092182ISI: 000376031400004PubMedID: 26496529Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84974711254OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-60616DiVA, id: diva2:1138390
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stiftelsen Sunnerdahls Handikappfond

Jimmy Dahlstens Fond

Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2017-09-05 Last updated: 2018-07-24Bibliographically approved

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Borgestig, Maria

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