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Sex of older siblings and cognitive function
Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6328-5494
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5996-2584
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background : Number of older siblings is associated with lower cognitive function, possibly as marker of material disadvantage. Sex differences may signal an influence of inter-sibling interactions.

Methods: The study used a national Swedish register-based cohort of men (n=644,603), born between 1970 and 1992 who undertook military conscription assessments in adolescence that included cognitive function measured on a normally-distributed scale of 1-9. Associations with siblings were investigated using linear regression.

Results: After adjustment for numbers of younger siblings, year of conscription assessment, age/year of birth, sex, European socioeconomic classification for parents and maternal age at delivery; the regression coefficients (and 95% confidence intervals) for cognitive function are -0.26 (-0.27, -0.25), -0.42 (-0.44, -0.40), and -0.72 (-0.76, -0.67) for one, two and three or more male older siblings, respectively, compared with none; and -0.22 (-0.23, -0.21), -0.39 (-.41, -0.37), -0.62 (-0.67, -0.58) for one two and three or more female older siblings, respectively, compared with none. A larger number of younger siblings is not associated with lower cognitive function in the adjusted model.

Conclusions: Family size is associated with cognitive function: older male siblings may have greater implications than females due to their demands on familial resources or through inter-sibling interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60996OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-60996DiVA: diva2:1140783
Conference
10th World Congress, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD 2017), Rotterdam, The Netherlands, October 15-18, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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Montgomery, ScottBergh, CeciliaUdumyan, RuzanEriksson, MatsFall, KatjaHiyoshi, Ayako

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Montgomery, ScottBergh, CeciliaUdumyan, RuzanEriksson, MatsFall, KatjaHiyoshi, Ayako
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Örebro University HospitalSchool of Medical SciencesSchool of Health Sciences
Clinical Medicine

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CiteExportLink to record
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