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Longitudinal associations between sleep and technology: Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Health and Medical Psychology)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1485-8564
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sleep duration decreases from puberty throughout adolescence. This decrease is normative and is due to both biological and psychosocial changes that push adolescents ́ bedtimes later. However, there are indications that a decrease in sleep duration in adolescents have worsened during the last 20 years (Maslowsky et al., 2014). So, biological changes do not explain the current decline in sleep duration fully. One mechanisms that has been hypothesized explaining this change isthe development of new technologies and internet accessibility around the clock. However, the majority of studies investigating the relationship between poor sleep and technology use at bedtime are cross-sectional. Thus, it cannot be excluded that adolescents use technology because they cannot fall asleep. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test whether technology use at bedtime predicted longer sleep onset latency (= time to fall asleep), or vice versa using cross lagged analyses over a 3-year period. Participants were high school students in the 7th and 8th grade (N = 2552; age range: 12-15 years, at baseline) from 17 public schools in three communities in middle Sweden. Students filled out questionnaires in school during the spring, 2014 (T1), 2015(T2) and 2016 (T3) (85% retention rate). Survey data included one question about technology use at bedtime and sleep onset latency (SOL).

Technology use at bedtime significantly predicted longer SOL and vice versa from T1 to T2. From T2 to T3 sleep predicted technology use but not vice versa.

This is the first study to investigate the reciprocal association between sleep and technology use in an adolescent population. It seems as technology use at bedtime and long sleep onset latency perpetuate each other in early adolescence, but later on adolescents who have a sleep problem seem to use technology as a way to cope with it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keywords [en]
Sleep, adolescents, technology use
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61202OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-61202DiVA, id: diva2:1146218
Conference
18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 29 - September 1, 2017
Projects
TrestadsstudienAvailable from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-10-03Bibliographically approved

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Bauducco, Serena

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf