oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Occurrence of anaemia in the first year of inflammatory bowel disease in a European population-based inception cohort: An ECCO-EpiCom study
Department of Gastroenterology, North Zealand University Hospital, Frederikssund, Denmark.
1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no 10, 1213-1222 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Anaemia is an important complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anaemia and the practice of anaemia screening during the first year following diagnosis in a European prospective population-based inception cohort.

Methods: Newly diagnosed IBD patients were included and followed prospectively for one year in 29 European and 1 Australian centre. Clinical data including demographics, medical therapy, surgery and blood samples were collected. Anaemia was defined according to the World Health Organization.

Results: A total of 1,871 patients (CD: 686, 88%; UC: 1,021, 87%; IBDU 164. 81%) were included in the study. The prevalence of anaemia was higher in CD than in UC patients and overall, 49% of CD and 39% of UC patients had at least one instance of anaemia during the first 12 months after diagnosis. UC patients with more extensive disease and those from Eastern European countries, and CD patients with penetrating disease or colonic disease location, had higher risks of anaemia. CD and UC patients in need of none or only mild anti-inflammatory treatment had a lower risk of anaemia. In a significant proportion of patients, anaemia was not assessed until several months after diagnosis, and in almost half of all cases of anaemia a thorough work-up was not performed.

Conclusions: Overall, 42% of patients had at least one instance of anaemia during the first year following diagnosis. Most patients were assessed for anaemia regularly; however, a full anaemia work-up was frequently neglected in this community setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017. Vol. 11, no 10, 1213-1222 p.
Keyword [en]
Anaemia, inflammatory bowel disease, prevalence
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60850DOI: 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjx077PubMedID: 28575481OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-60850DiVA: diva2:1147123
Note

Funding agencies:

Kirsten og Freddy Johansens fond

Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2017-10-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Halfvarson, Jonas
By organisation
School of Medical Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Crohn's & Colitis
Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf