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Acculturation Conflict, Cultural Parenting Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Parenting Competence in Asian American and Latino/a Families
Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0324-8450
Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
2017 (English)In: Family Process, ISSN 0014-7370, E-ISSN 1545-5300, Vol. 56, no 4, 943-961 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents from immigrant backgrounds must deal with normative parenting demands as well as unique challenges associated with acculturation processes. The current study examines the independent and interactive influences of acculturation conflict and cultural parenting self-efficacy (PSE; e.g., parents' confidence in instilling heritage, American, and bicultural values in their children) on perceptions of general parenting competence. Using data from 58 Asian American and 153 Latin American parents of children in grades 6-12, ethnic differences were also explored. Results suggest that lower acculturation conflict is associated with higher perceptions of general parenting competence for both Asian and Latin American parents. Higher cultural PSE is associated with higher perceived general parenting competence for Latino/a parents only. One significant interaction was found, and only for Asian Americans, whereby the negative association between acculturation conflict and perceptions of parenting competence was weaker for those who felt efficacious in transmitting heritage messages. Results are discussed in light of clinical implications and the need for further recognition and study of culturally relevant factors and frameworks among families from immigrant backgrounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017. Vol. 56, no 4, 943-961 p.
Keyword [en]
Acculturation, Parenting Competence, Cultural Parenting Self-Efficacy, Parent –Child Conflict, Immigrant Families
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62309DOI: 10.1111/famp.12266ISI: 000417276800011PubMedID: 27861802Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85003806645OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-62309DiVA: diva2:1156309
Available from: 2017-11-11 Created: 2017-11-11 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved

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Glatz, Terese

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