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Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and diethyl phthalate disrupt lipid metabolism, reduce fecundity and shortens lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Biology, the Life Science Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3302-7106
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Biology, the Life Science Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7336-6335
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Biology, the Life Science Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7957-0310
2018 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 190, p. 375-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The widespread use of phthalates is of major concern as they have adverse effects on many different physiological functions, including reproduction, metabolism and cell differentiation. The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity of the widely-used di (2-ethydlhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) with its substitute, diethyl phthalate (DEP). We analyzed the toxicity of these two phthalates using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system. Gene expression analysis following exposure during the L1 to young adult stage showed that DEHP and DEP alter the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and stress response. Genes associated with lipid metabolism, including fasn-1, pod-2, fat-5, acs-6 and sbp-1, and vitellogenin were upregulated. Among the stress response genes, ced-1 wah-1, daf-21 and gst-4 were upregulated, while cd-1, cdf-2 and the heat shock proteins (hsp-16.1, hsp-16.48 and sip-1) were down regulated. Lipid staining revealed that DEHP significantly increased lipid content following 1 mu M exposure, however, DEP required 10 mu M exposure to elicit an effect. Both DEHP and DEP reduced the fecundity at 1 mu M concentration. Lifespan analysis indicated that DEHP and DEP reduced the average lifespan from 14 days in unexposed worms to 13 and 12 days, respectively. Expression of lifespan associated genes showed a correlation to shortened lifespan in the exposed groups. As reported previously, our data also indicates that the banned DEHP is toxic to C. elegans, however its substitute DEP has not been previously tested in this model organism and our data revealed that DEP is equally potent as DEHP in regulating C. elegans physiological functions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 190, p. 375-382
Keywords [en]
Plasticizer, Metabolism, Reproduction, Toxicity, Longevity
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62890DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.09.123ISI: 000414881600041PubMedID: 29020644Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85030660035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-62890DiVA, id: diva2:1161862
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 201504600Knowledge Foundation, 20140180 20150084Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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Pradhan, AjayOlsson, Per-ErikJass, Jana

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