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Exploring practices and perceptions of alcohol use during pregnancy in England and Sweden through a cross-cultural lens
Nursing Studies, School of Health in Social Science, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Public Health Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
Public Health Wales, Hadyn Ellis Building, Cardiff University, Maindy Road, Cardiff, UK.
Public Health Wales, Hadyn Ellis Building, Cardiff University, Maindy Road, Cardiff, UK.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0185-0851
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 533-537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Qualitative studies have aimed to understand why some women continue to drink during pregnancy; however, there is a lack of comparative cross-cultural research. We aimed to explore perceptions and practices of alcohol use during pregnancy in England and Sweden.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 parents in Merseyside, England and 22 parents in Örebro County, Sweden. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and translated. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: The majority of women in both countries abstained from alcohol when they found out they were pregnant, despite alcohol being part of many social contexts before pregnancy. Nine of the seventeen English women drank at some point during pregnancy, typically on special occasions. Most parents felt women should modify their alcohol intake when they become mothers, though several English parents argued that responsible motherhood did not necessarily equate to abstinence. Swedish parents held strong opinions against drinking during pregnancy and argued that any amount of alcohol could harm the foetus. English parents' opinions were divided; some were skeptical of whether low to moderate drinking was associated with risks.

Conclusions: Practices and attitudes towards alcohol use during pregnancy and views on foetal rights and responsibilities of pregnant women differed in England and Sweden. Shared social norms around drinking may be shaped within the policy context of pregnancy drinking guidelines, determining whether women consume alcohol or not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 2018. Vol. 28, no 3, p. 533-537
National Category
Substance Abuse Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63035DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckx208ISI: 000434046900028PubMedID: 29206945OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63035DiVA, id: diva2:1163827
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson, Charli

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