oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Longitudinal depression or anxiety in mothers and offspring asthma: a Swedish population-based study
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York NY, USA.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous research has found that maternal stress during pregnancy increases the risk of offspring asthma. However, whether this association is consistent with a causal interpretation has never been tested. The objective is to determine whether there is a critical exposure period for maternal depression or anxiety on offspring asthma or whether cumulative exposure is most important, and to investigate evidence of confounding.

Methods: The study population included all children born in Sweden from July 2006 to December 2009 (n = 360 526). Information about childhood asthma, maternal depression or anxiety (diagnosis or medication) and covariates was obtained from the Swedish national health registers. The associations between exposure periods (pre-conception, pregnancy, postnatal or current) and childhood asthma were estimated using structured life course approach hypothesis testing. Paternal and cousin analyses were used to test for evidence of confounding from shared genes and environment.

Results: For childhood asthma, cumulative exposure best described the effect of exposure to maternal depression or anxiety up to a maximum of any two exposure periods [adjusted odds ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38, 1.52]. The hypotheses of a critical period were not supported. The paternal and cousin analyses indicated minimal influence from familial confounding.

Conclusions: These findings support an association between cumulative exposure to maternal depression or anxiety and asthma development in offspring. This association is unique for maternal depression or anxiety and not due to familial confounding. The clinical implication is that effective psychological management of women with chronic distress may reduce offspring asthma risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018. Vol. 47, no 1, p. 166-174
Keywords [en]
Asthma, anxiety, children, depression, mothers
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62418DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyx208ISI: 000426148300029PubMedID: 29040553Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85042681005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-62418DiVA, id: diva2:1164481
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Research Council through the Swedish Initiative for research on Microdata in the Social And Medical sciences (SIMSAM)  340-2013-5867

Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association's Research Foundation  

Stockholm County Council (ALF project) 

Commission under a COFAS Marie Curie Fellowship  2015-01208

Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Larsson, Henrik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Larsson, Henrik
By organisation
School of Medical Sciences
In the same journal
International Journal of Epidemiology
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 60 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf