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Testosterone-like immunoreactivity in hair measured in minute sample amounts - a competitive radioimmunoassay with an adequate limit of detection
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Neurology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6681-0546
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 17636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concentrations of testosterone deposited in hair during hair growth may provide a retrospective reflection of the concentrations of bioactive testosterone in plasma. The objective of this study was to develop a radioimmunoassay with a sufficiently low limit of detection to measure the testosterone-like immunoreactivity in smaller hair samples (5 mg) than used in earlier studies, and to compare three different extraction procedures. The competitive radioimmunoassay consisted of a polyclonal antiserum (immunogen testosterone-7 alpha-BSA) and a radioligand synthesised from testosterone-3-CMO-histamine. The within-assay and total coefficients of variation in the working range was 3% and 4.5%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.87 pg/mL, which is equivalent to 0.12 pg/mg testosterone in 5 mg of hair. The concentration of testosterone-like immunoreactivity in hair samples was 1.23 (SD 0.47) pg/mg in women and 2.67 (SD 0.58) pg/mg in men (pulverised hair). Significantly improved precision was found when pulverised hair was used compared to non-pulverised hair. Our data indicate that pulverisation of the hair prior to hormone extraction is crucial. Detection limits fit for the intended purpose are achievable with 5 mg samples of hair.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017. Vol. 7, article id 17636
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63817DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-17930-wISI: 000418250800021PubMedID: 29247184Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85038244979OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63817DiVA, id: diva2:1170632
Note

Funding Agency:

County Council of Östergötland

Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Ström, Jakob O.

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