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Food deprivation alters liver glycogen metabolism and endocrine responses to hemorrhage
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Departments of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2636-4745
Departments of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Departments of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Departments of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital/Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
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1990 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0002-9513, E-ISSN 2163-5773, Vol. 259, no 5 Part 1, p. E692-E698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Liver glycogen content, blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, and epinephrine were determined during 1 h hemorrhagic hypotension at 60 mmHg and 23 h thereafter in fed and two groups of 24-h food-deprived rats receiving either no infusion or 30% glucose intravenously during hemorrhage. Liver glycogen content was reduced by greater than 90% after 24-h food deprivation. Fed and food-deprived rats given glucose developed similar and substantial elevations of blood glucose during hemorrhage, whereas changes in blood glucose were modest in food-deprived rats given no infusion. In fed rats, liver glycogen was reduced by 60% during the 1-h bleed, but within 2 h after hemorrhage repletion of liver glycogen content commenced. By 6 h, approximately 75% of the glycogen lost during hemorrhage had been restored, and 23 h after hemorrhage liver glycogen content was six times greater compared with nonbled controls. Although glycogen levels increased after hemorrhage in food-deprived animals, the increase was negligible compared with that found in fed rats. Infusion of glucose during hemorrhage or adrenergic blockade after hemorrhage did not alter glycogen repletion in food-deprived rats. Posthemorrhage fed animals had high levels of insulin, glucagon, and epinephrine during hemorrhage, whereas insulin levels remained low in food-deprived rats despite exogenously induced hyperglycemia. It is concluded that rapid and substantial glycogen repletion can occur even immediately poststress. The conditions seem to be related to the nutritional state at the time of the insult.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physiological Society , 1990. Vol. 259, no 5 Part 1, p. E692-E698
National Category
Physiology Nutrition and Dietetics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63835DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.1990.259.5.E692ISI: A1990EJ48100031PubMedID: 2240208Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0025049241OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63835DiVA, id: diva2:1170920
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved

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