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Pretreatment with glucose infusion prevents fatal outcome after hemorrhage in food deprived rats
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2636-4745
1993 (English)In: Circulatory Shock, ISSN 0092-6213, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twenty-four hour food deprivation increases mortality after experimental hemorrhage. Survival after hemorrhage is closely related to the capacity of the animal to develop hyperglycemia. In this study, 24 hr food deprived rats were given a 3-hr infusion of either 0.3 ml/100 g b.wt./h 30% glucose iv (n = 10) or the same volume of 0.9% NaCl (n = 10) prior to 60 min of standardized hemorrhage. Glucose infusion resulted in a transient hyperglycemia, and 600% greater hepatic glycogen content compared to saline (P < 0.001). During hemorrhage, glucose-treated rats developed substantial hyperglycemia while glucose levels fell in saline treated (P < 0.001). Concomitant developments in hematocrits indicated improved plasma refill in glucose treated animals (P < 0.01). While saline treated rats developed irreversible shock and died within 3 hr of bleeding, glucose treated rats had a MAP of 52 ± 2 (mean ± SEM) mm Hg by the end of hemorrhage (P < 0.01). All glucose-treated rats recovered and survived the seven-day observation period. It is concluded that glucose infusion leading to hepatic glycogen repletion alters outcome after experimental hemorrhage in food deprived animals. These experimental results may be of clinical relevance, since elective surgery is generally performed after overnight fasting, which substantially reduces the hepatic glycogen reserve.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 1993. Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-6
Keywords [en]
Hepatic glycogen, fluid shift, survival, fasting, hyperglycemia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63841ISI: A1993KF38100001PubMedID: 8481972Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0027475842OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63841DiVA, id: diva2:1170935
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved

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Ljungqvist, Olle

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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