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Food deprivation increases bacterial translocation after non-lethal haemorrhage in rats
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2636-4745
1995 (English)In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 161, no 2, p. 67-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether brief fasting before the induction of hypotension by non-lethal haemorrhage may induce translocation of enteric bacteria to mesenteric lymph nodes or blood in rats.

DESIGN:

Laboratory experiment.

SETTING:

University departments of surgery and microbiology, Sweden.

MATERIAL:

39 Male Sprague-Dawley rats.

INTERVENTIONS:

20 animals were fasted for 24 hours, all 39 then underwent controlled haemorrhage for 60 minutes that reduced the blood pressure to 55 mm Hg.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Differences in blood loss, blood glucose concentrations, and packed cell volume; and aerobic cultures of mesenteric lymph nodes and blood.

RESULTS:

Fasted rats (n = 20) lost 2.3% of blood volume compared with 2.8% in fed rats(p < 0.001). Packed cell volume dropped by 11.3% in fasted rats and 16.5% in fed rats (p < 0.001). Glucose concentrations rose by 7.0 mmol/l in fasted rats compared with 21.0 mmol/l in fed rats (p < 0.001). Mesenteric lymph nodes contained enteric bacteria in 14/20 fasted rats compared with 6/19 fed rats (p < 0.05). In 4 fasted rats blood cultures grew pathogenic bacteria compared with no fed rats (p = 0.11). The number of bacteria found in mesenteric lymph nodes was significantly greater in fasted than in fed rats (p = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Brief fasting before hypotension caused by non-lethal haemorrhage was associated with significantly increased bacterial translocation compared with fed animals. Increases in blood glucose concentrations and plasma refill may have had a protective effect in fed rats. These experiments may be of clinical relevance as elective operations are usually preceded by overnight fasting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Scandinavia , 1995. Vol. 161, no 2, p. 67-71
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63856ISI: A1995QN49400001PubMedID: 7772633Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0028906198OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63856DiVA, id: diva2:1170971
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved

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Ljungqvist, Olle

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