oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Energyenriched hospital food to improve energy intake in elderly patients
Nutrition Team, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Nutrition Team, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Nutrition Center, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Nutrition Center, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
1996 (English)In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 93-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: It was hypothesized that energy intake in hospitalized elderly patients could be improved by increasing the density of energy of the food and that the volume of food actually consumed, even with a higher energy content than the normal, would not change with servings of high energy-dense hospital food. Methods: Thirty-six elderly patients (52 to 96 years) of both sexes, long-term treated at two comparable wards, participated in this study. The patients were given 6 weeks of regular hospital food (RHF, 1670 kcal/d, 7.0 MJ) and 6 weeks of high-energy food (HE, 2520 kcal/d, 10.5 MJ). The volume of food was kept constant. A crossover study design was used. Food intake, energy intake, body weight, and modified functional condition (Norton scale) were measured. Results: Regardless of type of food (RHF or HE) and time of day (lunch or dinner), the food portion size (volume of food) intake was the same, approximately 80% of the portions consumed. HE led to a 40% increase in energy intake (from 25 ± 1 during RHF to 35 ± 2 kcal/kg/d, p <.0001), which resulted in a 3.4% increase in body weight (p <.001) after 3 weeks of HE. Only minimal changes in functional condition were found. The cost of HE was substantially lower (-85%) than any other mean available for improvement of energy intake. Conclusions: A significant increase in energy intake can be achieved by higher energy density in regular hospital food and that HE does not cause a decrease in the volume of the food consumed. These findings suggest that it is the volume of food rather than the energy that limits voluntary energy intake of hospital food in elderly hospitalized patients. (Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 20:93–97, 1996)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1996. Vol. 20, no 2, p. 93-97
National Category
Surgery Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63866DOI: 10.1177/014860719602000293ISI: A1996UA97800001PubMedID: 8676539OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63866DiVA, id: diva2:1171005
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Ljungqvist, Olle

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ljungqvist, Olle
By organisation
School of Medical Sciences
In the same journal
JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
SurgeryNutrition and Dietetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 54 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf