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Pre-stress carbohydrate solution prevents fatal outcome after hemorrhage in 24 hour food deprived rats
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2636-4745
1996 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 696-699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twenty-four-hour food deprivation increases mortality after experimental hemorrhage. Survival after hemorrhageis closely related to the capacity of the animal to develop hyperglycemia. In this study, 24-h food-deprived ratswere subjected to hemorrhage over a period of 75 min, standardized to reach a final blood pressure of 45 mmHg. Just prior to hemorrhage, the rats ingested a carbohydrate solution (n = 8) 2.16 mL/100 g body weight (b.wt.) or the same volume of water sweetened with sodiumsaccarinate (n = 7). A third group (n = 8) received an IV infusion of 5% glucose 0.5 mL/100 g b. wt. to mimic the hyperglycemia during hemorrhage of rats taking carbohydrates before stress. During hemorrhage rats treated with oral carbohydrate and IV glucose developed moderate hyperglycemia while glucose levels fell in water-treated rats (P < 0.001). Concomitant developments in hematocrits indicated improved plasma refill in carbohydrate and glucose-treated animals versus controls (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in blood pressure by the end of hemorrhage. Six of the seven animals treated with water died within 2 h of bleeding. In both the carbohydrate- and the glucose-treated groups 7 of 8 animals recovered and survived the 7-d observation period (P < 0.05 versus controls). It is concluded that oral carbohydrate solution before hemorrhage can alter the outcome after experimental hemorrhage. The similar finding in rats given IV glucose suggests that the key factor for survival was the capacity to mount a state of hyperglycemia during hemorrhage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 1996. Vol. 12, no 10, p. 696-699
National Category
Physiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63870ISI: A1996VR97500006PubMedID: 8936493Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0030271688OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-63870DiVA, id: diva2:1171015
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-02-06Bibliographically approved

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