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Evaluating the utility of ‘strength’ items when assessing the risk of young offenders
Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8285-0935
Department of Psychology, Institute for the Reduction of Youth Violence, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.
Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, ISSN 1478-9949, E-ISSN 1478-9957, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 597-616Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is emerging recognition that positive or pro-social characteristics may lessen criminal propensity. There are now several adult and youth forensic instruments that include protective or strength components. Yet evidence supporting the protective capacities of these instruments with youth offending populations is still developing. This study aimed to identity the prevalence of strength items on the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory tool, and their relationships with risk and re-offending for a cohort of 212 multi-cultural Australian juveniles in custody. The prevalence of strengths in the sample was low, and differed by cultural group. Young people who possessed a strength yielded lower instrument total and domain scores and were more likely to be afforded a lower level of risk compared to youth without a strength. Moreover, youth who possessed a strength were significantly more likely to desist from re-offending. This association remained after controlling for level of risk. Findings point to the importance of strengths when assessing a young person’s risk for re-offending.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018. Vol. 29, no 4, p. 597-616
Keywords [en]
youth violence; protective factors; yls/cMi; violence risk assessment; strengths
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64325DOI: 10.1080/14789949.2018.1425474ISI: 000437365700006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-64325DiVA, id: diva2:1174812
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-07-25Bibliographically approved

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Strand, Susanne

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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