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Mothers’ opinions on being asked about exposure to intimate partner violence in child healthcare centres in Sweden
Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4700-1452
Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7352-8234
2018 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes a hidden health risk for exposed mothers and children. In Sweden, screening for IPV in healthcare has only been routine during pregnancy, despite an increase in IPV following childbirth. The arguments against routine questions postpartum have concerned a lack of evidence of beneficial effects as well as fear of stigmatizing women or placing abused women at further risk. Increased understanding of women’s attitudes to routine questions may allay these fears. In this study, 198 mothers in 12 child healthcare centres (CHCs) filled in a short questionnaire about their exposure and received information on IPV at a regular baby check-up visit. The mothers’ lifetime prevalence of exposure to IPV was 16%. One hundred and twenty-eight mothers participated in a telephone interview, giving their opinion on the screening experience. The intervention was well-received by most of the mothers who reported that questions and information on IPV are essential for parents, considering the health risks for children, and that the CHC is a natural arena for this. Necessary prerequisites were that questioning be routine to avoid stigmatizing and be offered in privacy without the partner being present.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018. Vol. 22, no 2, p. 228-237
Keywords [en]
Child healthcare, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, routine screening
National Category
Social Work Pediatrics Nursing
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64927DOI: 10.1177/1367493517753081ISI: 000434024600006PubMedID: 29334792Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85047936118OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-64927DiVA, id: diva2:1181491
Note

Funding Agencies:

Karlstad University  

County Council of Värmland  

County Council of Örebro län  

Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2018-02-08 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved

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Källström, ÅsaAnderzen-Carlsson, Agneta

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