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Organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers in indoor dust, air and window wipes in newly built low-energy preschools
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM)
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5729-1908
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4128-8226
2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 628-629, p. 159-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The construction of extremely airtight and energy efficient low-energy buildings is achieved by using functional building materials, such as age-resistant plastics, insulation, adhesives, and sealants. Additives such as organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) can be added to some of these building materials as flame retardants and plasticizers. Some OPFRs are considered persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Therefore, in this pilot study, the occurrence and distribution of nine OPFRs were determined for dust, air, and window wipe samples collected in newly built low-energy preschools with and without environmental certifications. Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were detected in all indoor dust samples at concentrations ranging from 0.014 to 10 μg/g and 0.0069 to 79 μg/g, respectively. Only six OPFRs (predominantly chlorinated OPFRs) were detected in the indoor air. All nine OPFRs were found on the window surfaces and the highest concentrations, which occurred in the reference preschool, were measured for 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP) (maximum concentration: 1500 ng/m2). Interestingly, the OPFR levels in the environmental certified low-energy preschools were lower than those in the reference preschool and the non-certified low-energy preschool, probably attributed to the usage of environmental friendly and low-emitting building materials, interior decorations, and consumer products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 628-629, p. 159-168
Keywords [en]
Organophosphate flame retardant, Plasticizer, Low-energy preschool, Environmental certified building, Indoor dust, Surface wipe
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65565DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.053ISI: 000432462000018PubMedID: 29432927Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85041523162OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-65565DiVA, id: diva2:1188632
Note

Funding Agencies:

Healthy Building Forum (HBF)

Örebro University

Department of Occupational and Environ-mental Medicine at Örebro University Hospital

Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

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Persson, JosefinWang, ThanhHagberg, Jessika

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