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Eye-Gaze Control Technology as Early Intervention for a Non-Verbal Young Child with High Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report
Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
The Swedish National Center for Rett Syndrome & Related Disorders, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Technologies, E-ISSN 2227-7080, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Assistive technology (AT) can be used as early intervention in order to reduce activity limitations in play and communication. This longitudinal case study examines eye-gaze control technology as early intervention for a young child with high spinal cord injury without the ability to make sounds. The young child was followed by repeated measures concerning performance and communication from baseline at 9 months to 26 months, and finalized at 36 months by field observations in the home setting. The results showed eye-gaze performance and frequency of use of eye-gaze control technology increased over time. Goals set at 15 months concerning learning and using the AT; naming objects and interactions with family was successfully completed at 26 months. Communicative functions regarding obtaining objects and social interaction increased from unintentional actions to purposeful choices and interactions. At 36 months, the toddler was partly independent in eye gazing, used all activities provided, and made independent choices. In conclusion, the results show that a 9-month-old child with profound motor disabilities can benefit from eye-gaze control technology in order to gradually perform activities, socially interact with family members, and make choices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG , 2018. Vol. 6, no 1, article id 12
Keywords [en]
tetraplegia, gaze-based assistive technology, communication, goal directed activities, self-help devices
National Category
Occupational Therapy Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65635DOI: 10.3390/technologies6010012ISI: 000425847400011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-65635DiVA, id: diva2:1189601
Note

This paper is an extended version of our paper in Proceedings of AAATE2017 Congres, Sheffield, UK, 13–14 September 2017; with permission from IOS Press.

Available from: 2018-03-12 Created: 2018-03-12 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved

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Borgestig, Maria

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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