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Digital resources in diverse classrooms – the need of combining digital technology with functional and critical literacy
University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Utbildning och demokrati)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9233-3691
2018 (English)In: NERA 2018- 46th CONGRESS. Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts, 2018, p. 336-337Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Through the use of various digital resources, it is crucial that education support student’s subject- and literacy learning in integrated ways (Cummins, 2001; Schmidt & Skoog, 2016). Since digital literacies, compared with printed literacies, bring about other ways of producing and using texts in terms of multimodality and hybridity across time and space, this challenge the conditions for in what ways teaching and learning is carried out in classrooms (Kress & Selander, 2011; Walsh, 2008). In Sweden, new knowledge demands regarding digital competence will be implemented, among other things with regards to source criticism. To understand who has produced a text and with what purpose, and how to evaluate this information, are part of fundamental critical approaches, which includes source criticism (Janks, 2010). Drawing on a larger classroom study, this paper focuses on teachers and students use of digital resources during 24 lessons in two Grade six classrooms in the subject areas of Laws and Right and Information and Commercials. Our focus is on in what ways the digital resources and their content are introduced and drawn upon, and which approaches of source criticism that are integrated. We ask:

• What digital resources are included?

• In what ways are these resources introduced and used?

• What approaches of source criticism emerge?

• Do any differences emerge when comparing digital and printed resources?

Drawing on video recordings and retrospective interviews with teachers and students, we have analysed the data in relation to the above aim and questions. The analysis reveals the multifaceted possibilities of digital resources, such as web sites, video clips, online educational portals and so on. The analysis makes it clear that interaction and dialogue in relation to the digital resources tend to be overlooked, when compared with the printed resources. Further, the result sheds light on the challenges regarding source criticism. In both subject areas, norms and values are present, but not deepened in relation to the subject content.

We argue, that in order to compare and evaluate digital and online information, and to create knowledge, students need to be supported in the beginning of and throughout the learning process (Alexander, 2008; Schmidt & Skoog, 2016). In addition, we argue that critical reflections must be connected to subject specific content in relation to diversity and equality, and articulated and practiced through teachers’ and students’ own talk (Alexander, 2008; Schmidt & Skoog, 2017).

ReferencesAlexander, R. (2008). Essays on Pedagogy. London & New York: Routledge.Cummins, J. (2001). Negotiating Identities: Education for Empowerment in a Diverse Society. Second Edition. Los Angeles: California Association for Bilingual Education.Janks, H. (2010). Literacy and Power. London: Routledge.Kress, G. & Selander, S. (2011). Multimodal design, learning and cultures of recognition. Internet and Higher Education 15 (2012) 265–268Schmidt, C. & Skoog, M. (2016). Classroom interaction and its potential for literacy learning. Nordic Journal of Literacy Research 3, pp. 45–60. http://dx.doi.org/10.23865/njlr.v3.474Walsh, M. (2008). Worlds have collided and modes have merged: classroom evidence of changed literacy practices. Literacy, 42 (2), pp. 101–108.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. p. 336-337
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65804OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-65804DiVA, id: diva2:1190565
Conference
46th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA 2018), Oslo, Norway, March 8-10, 2018
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Skoog, Marianne

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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