oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Child education, child labor and the agricultural economy
Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9571-2315
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Over the last decades, we have seen impressive progress in development around the world, and the proportion of people living in poverty (on less than $1.25 a day) has decreased from 36 percent in 1990 to 18 percent in 2010. However, this progress has been unequal, and a large part of the change is due to the development of some Asian countries, while most countries in Africa have seen more modest development. In sub- Saharan Africa, approximately 48 percent of the population still lives on less than $1.25 a day (UN 2014). There is also considerable inequality within countries. For example, in Kenya, the richest 10 percent of the population receives an estimated 40 percent of total income (World Bank 2014). Most poor people live in rural parts of the country, and they are more likely to be women, children, or members of a minority ethnic group. The research presented in this brief focus on these individuals, the most vulnerable in society. The paper draws substantially from my Ph.D. dissertation “Essays on Child Education, Child Labor and the Agricultural Economy”. The dissertation consists of four separate papers, with somewhat different focus. The first two papers focus on children and human capital, while the other two focus on the agricultural economy. In the first paper we ask whether children from different ethnolinguistic backgrounds have different probabilities of being in school. In the second paper I examine the connection between income diversification and working children. In the third paper I look at income diversification among female-headed households. In the last paper we analyze how different groups of households are affected when the price of maize increases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm, Sweden: Expertgruppen för Biståndsanalys (EBA) , 2016. , p. 14
Series
Dissertation Brief Series ; 2016:04
National Category
Social Sciences Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65878OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-65878DiVA, id: diva2:1191542
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-03-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Child Education, Child Labor and the Agricultural Economy(433 kB)16 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 433 kBChecksum SHA-512
a0b2f6aaac05e656cc3e81f2839256fa5edf93826d0bc1385553a8ea5404100510d0675b8ee7c554c097f7ad992b7d7253043f2f1eae5e5694b10a08d3b5564c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Vimefall, Elin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Vimefall, Elin
By organisation
Örebro University School of Business
Social SciencesEconomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 16 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 29 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf