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Gut microbiota modulation and implications for host health: dietary strategies to influence the gut-brain axis
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland; Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8591-0799
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland, Ireland.
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland, Ireland.
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), University College, Cork, Ireland; Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
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2013 (English)In: Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies, ISSN 1466-8564, E-ISSN 1878-5522, Vol. 22, p. 239-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human intestinal microbiota evolves from an immature and unstable ecosystem during infancy into a more complex and stable ecosystem in adulthood. Diet is one of the main factors contributing to the composition and diversity of the human intestinal microbiota. From birth, breast milk offers the best nutritional regime for maturation of the gut, whereas the introduction of solid food selects the most adapted bacteria, converging towards an adult-like microbiota. The gut microbiota plays an important role in host health, influencing the maturation of the immune system and regulating energy metabolism. Moreover, it has become evident that the microbiota can affect brain function and behaviour. On this bidirectional communication between intestine and the central nervous system (CNS), the so called gut-brain axis, the gut influences brain development and biochemistry, whereas the brain affects gastrointestinal function. In this context, probiotics and prebiotics have been used as dietary strategies aimed at improving host health by modulating the gut ecosystem and, consequently, affecting host stress-responses, behaviour and cognition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013. Vol. 22, p. 239-247
Keywords [en]
Microbiota, Probiotics, Prebiotics, Gut–brain axis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65938DOI: 10.1016/j.ifset.2013.10.016ISI: 000335108700030Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84897037252OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-65938DiVA, id: diva2:1192030
Note

Funding Agencies:

Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) 

Irish Government's National Development Plan, 07/CE/B1368

Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC)

Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved

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Marques, Tatiana M.

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