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Dietary Inflammatory Index and its relation to cardio-metabolic health markers in elderly community dwelling women.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
2018 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The metabolic syndrome (MetS), is often used to describe cardio-metabolic

health. MetS is more prevalent in the elderly community. Chronic low-grade inflammation is

considered a factor for developing MetS, and might be mediated by inflammatory potential of

food items. Dietary inflammatory index (DII), is a tool for evaluating dietary inflammatory

potential. Well-defined samples from high-risk populations are seldom used when studying

inflammation and DII, and time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is

rarely considered. The aim was therefore to assess DII in a well-defined sample of elderly

women and investigate potential influence of DII on markers for cardio-metabolic health

while controlling for moderate- to vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Material and methods: 112 women (65-75 yrs.) were assessed for: dietary intake, waist

circumference, body mass index, MVPA, systolic/diastolic-blood pressure, and triglyceride,

HDL/LDL-cholesterol, plasma-glucose, adiponectin, c-reactive protein, fibrinogen levels. DII

was created from dietary intake and divided into tertiles. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA)

was employed to check variance among variables while controlling for MVPA.

Results: DII scores ranged from anti- to pro-inflammatory (-3,72<->4,10), with median DII

score at 55th percentile on scale of representative values. The DII score did not influence

cardio-metabolic health markers in this study-sample. Increased time in MVPA was

associated with lower DII scores. MetS, while not significant, was less prevalent in the lowest

tertile of the DII compared to highest tertile.

Conclusions: The results from this study casts doubts on using DII for evaluating

inflammatory potential of a diet. In this well-defined study sample, the DII failed to

categorize subjects according to their level of inflammation. However, a statistically

significant relationship between DII and physical activity was discovered, hinting at joint

variability among healthy lifestyle behaviors. These results highlight the need for further

studies to verify the link between DII, cardio-metabolic health, and MVPA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
Physical activity, Westernized diet, Metabolic syndrome, C-reactive protein.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66075OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-66075DiVA, id: diva2:1193206
Subject / course
Sports Science
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf