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Work-Home Interference and Burnout A Study Based on Swedish Twins
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; WorkWell, Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Westonaria, South Africa.
Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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Number of Authors: 62014 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study sets out to investigate the impact of work-home interference on burnout in women and men, while taking genetic and family environmental factors into account.

Methods: A total of 4446 Swedish twins were included in the study. The effects of work-home conflict (WHC) and home-work conflict (HWC) on burnout between and within pairs were analyzed with co-twin control analyses.

Results: Both WHC and HWC were significantly associated with burnout. Genetic factors may be involved in the association between HWC and burnout in women. Familial factors were not involved for WHC and burnout, neither for women nor for men.

Conclusions: This study shows the importance to encounter WHC per se to prevent burnout. Because of genetic confounding in HWC and burnout in women, preventive efforts may also take into account individual characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014. Vol. 56, no 4, p. 361-366
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66146DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000128ISI: 000335567400010PubMedID: 24709761Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84898453761OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-66146DiVA, id: diva2:1193345
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0548]Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stockholm Stress Center  

Stockholm University  

Department of Higher Education  

AstraZeneca 

National Institute of Health, USA  DK 066134  CA 085739

Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved

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Bodin, Lennart

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