oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
An alternative perspective on assistive technology: the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6410-2474
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6703-7575
2018 (English)In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The medical and social models of disability are based on a dichotomy that categorizes people as able-bodied or disabled. In contrast, the biopsychosocial model, which forms the basis for the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), suggests a universalistic perspective on human functioning, encompassing all human beings. In this article we argue that the artificial separation of function-enhancing technology into assistive technology (AT) and mainstream technology might be one of the barriers to a universalistic view of human functioning. Thus, an alternative view of AT is needed. The aim of this article was to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate how all human activities and participation depend on factors related to the person, environment, and tools, emphasizing a universalistic perspective on human functioning. In the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model, a person's activity and participation are described as a function of factors related to the person, environment, and tool, drawing on various ICF components. Importantly, the PET model makes no distinction between people of different ability levels, between environmental modifications intended for people of different ability levels, or between different function-enhancing technologies (AT and mainstream technology). A fictive patient case is used to illustrate how the universalistic view of the PET model lead to a different approach in rehabilitation. The PET model supports a universalistic view of technology use, environmental adaptations, and variations in human functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Taylor & Francis, 2018.
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66705DOI: 10.1080/10400435.2018.1467514PubMedID: 29676966OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-66705DiVA, id: diva2:1200230
Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Jarl, GustavLundqvist, Lars-Olov

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jarl, GustavLundqvist, Lars-Olov
By organisation
School of Medical SciencesÖrebro University HospitalSchool of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Assistive technology
Orthopaedics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 123 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf