oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Doing Intersectionality in Gender-Based Violence: The Dynamics of Inclusion, Opposition, Coalition and Power
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Centre for Feminist Social Studies)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7822-4563
Radboud University, Nijmegen, Holland.
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The paper asks how gender-based violence politics is inclusionary or exclusionary of other inequality projects. In understanding violence and gender equality as projects, the paper highlights how the boundaries between policy, implementation, and social movements are blurred, contributing to a new way of analysing gender-based violence politics.

The paper distinguishes four different approaches, illustrating them empirically. 

1. How are intersectional spaces negotiated, deliberated or struggled over in gender-based violence politics? What constraints and opportunities for intersectional politics are set up and provided by the political and policymaking institutions? Which civil society politics impact on this?

2. A focus on “doing intersectionality”. How do institutions and CSOs working on gender-based violence address intersectionality in practice? This prioritizes the question of how intersectionality is done in practice (service provision, cooperation between ‘gender organisations’ and ‘ethnicity organisations’, alliances, coalitions, hierarchies or co-optation.

3. To articulate how intersectionality plays out in opposition to gender equality within gender-based violence politics. Who is opposing and/or co-opting intersectionality in gender-based violence politics? How, in what ways, and why? Importantly, here the powerful are kept in sight, especially how the interests of majority groups are represented, created and ‘done’. Who is said to be losing from intersectionality? Are certain groups of women marginalised in certain practices? Is it gender solo that is opposed, or gender+? 

4. Therelations between different political domains (Walby 2009)? How is (sensitivity to) intersectionality in the violence domain affected by or affecting, developments in other domains (polity, civil society, economy)? Here social class is brought back into the analysis. 

The paper concludes by showing how the four approaches, together, provide a more comprehensive understanding of intersectionality and of gender-based violence.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66905OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-66905DiVA, id: diva2:1204537
Conference
ECPR Joint Sessions, Nicosia, Cyprus, April 10-14, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Strid, Sofia

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Strid, Sofia
By organisation
School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 1087 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf