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Artistic creativity and risk for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression: a Swedish population-based case-control study and sib-pair analysis
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College, London, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Sweden; Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 212, no 6, p. 370-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Many studies have addressed the question of whether mental disorder is associated with creativity, but high-quality epidemiological evidence has been lacking.

AIMS: To test for an association between studying a creative subject at high school or university and later mental disorder.

METHOD: In a case-control study using linked population-based registries in Sweden (N = 4 454 763), we tested for associations between tertiary education in an artistic field and hospital admission with schizophrenia (N = 20 333), bipolar disorder (N = 28 293) or unipolar depression (N = 148 365).

RESULTS: Compared with the general population, individuals with an artistic education had increased odds of developing schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% CI = [1.69; 2.12]) bipolar disorder (odds ratio = 1.62 [1.50; 1.75]) and unipolar depression (odds ratio = 1.39 [1.34; 1.44]. The results remained after adjustment for IQ and other potential confounders.

CONCLUSIONS: Students of artistic subjects at university are at increased risk of developing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal College of Psychiatry , 2018. Vol. 212, no 6, p. 370-376
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66876DOI: 10.1192/bjp.2018.23PubMedID: 29697041OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-66876DiVA, id: diva2:1209680
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-05-23Bibliographically approved

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