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Artistic creativity and risk for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression: a Swedish population-based case-control study and sib-pair analysis
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College, London, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Sweden; Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 212, no 6, p. 370-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Many studies have addressed the question of whether mental disorder is associated with creativity, but high-quality epidemiological evidence has been lacking.

AIMS: To test for an association between studying a creative subject at high school or university and later mental disorder.

METHOD: In a case-control study using linked population-based registries in Sweden (N = 4 454 763), we tested for associations between tertiary education in an artistic field and hospital admission with schizophrenia (N = 20 333), bipolar disorder (N = 28 293) or unipolar depression (N = 148 365).

RESULTS: Compared with the general population, individuals with an artistic education had increased odds of developing schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% CI = [1.69; 2.12]) bipolar disorder (odds ratio = 1.62 [1.50; 1.75]) and unipolar depression (odds ratio = 1.39 [1.34; 1.44]. The results remained after adjustment for IQ and other potential confounders.

CONCLUSIONS: Students of artistic subjects at university are at increased risk of developing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal College of Psychiatry , 2018. Vol. 212, no 6, p. 370-376
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-66876DOI: 10.1192/bjp.2018.23ISI: 000434294200007PubMedID: 29697041OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-66876DiVA, id: diva2:1209680
Note

Funding Agencies:

Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation  

Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience  

Swedish Research Council through the Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social and Medical Sciences  340-2013-5867 

South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust 

Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-08-02Bibliographically approved

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