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Family practises among Swedish parents: extracurricular activities and social class
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Arbete, familj och nära relationer)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6522-6025
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Arbete, familj och nära relationer)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7091-3348
2018 (English)In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 764-784Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research suggests that compared with working-class parents, middle-class parents more commonly enrol their children in organised activities with the aim of increasing their prospects of future success in education and working life.  Organised activities are seen as an important contribution to the reproduction of social class. Most of previous studies originate from the UK and the US. Drawing on a Bourdieusian understanding of social class, this study contributes to the discussion by exploring class-based reasoning about extracurricular activities among Swedish parents. As a ‘social-democratic welfare regime’, Sweden provides a markedly different institutional and social context than is usually found in the literature. In the present study, interviews with 37 working-class and middle-class parents are qualitatively analysed. Findings show similarities in parents’ reasoning, indicating that Swedish parenting culture and childrearing ideals partly cross class boundaries. They also suggest, however, that the middle-class parents typically regarded extracurricular activities as more important, and enrolled their children in more activities, than the working-class parents. One group of working-class parents did not enrol their children in extracurricular activities. The contradiction between similarities emanating from dominant national cultural understandings of parenting and childrearing and dissimilarities based on class-culture socialisation is explored in this article. One tentative conclusion is that working-class parents’ lower participation levels is not only explained by cultural and financial resources, but also by limited control over working hours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018. Vol. 20, no 5, p. 764-784
Keywords [en]
Extracurricular activities, parenting culture, concerted cultivation, time pressure, social class
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-67122DOI: 10.1080/14616696.2018.1473622ISI: 000448274300004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85047433275OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-67122DiVA, id: diva2:1211024
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-0263Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved

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Sjödin, DanielRoman, Christine

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