oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Germ cell depletion in zebrafish leads to incomplete masculinization of the brain
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Biology, The Life Science Center)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3302-7106
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Biology, The Life Science Center)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7336-6335
2018 (English)In: General and Comparative Endocrinology, ISSN 0016-6480, E-ISSN 1095-6840, Vol. 265, no SI, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Zebrafish sex differentiation is under the control of multiple genes, but also relies on germ cell number for gonadal development. Morpholino and chemical mediated germ cell depletion leads to sterile male development in zebrafish. In this study we produced sterile males, using a dead end gene morpholino, to determine gonadal-brain interactions. Germ cell depletion following dnd inhibition downregulated the germ cell markers, vasa and ziwi, and later the larvae developed as sterile males. Despite lacking proper testis, the gonadal 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and estradiol (E2) levels of sterile males were similar to wild type males. Qualitative analysis of sexual behavior of sterile males demonstrated that they behaved like wild type males. Furthermore, we observed that brain 11-KT and E2 levels in sterile males remained the same as in the wild type males. In female brain, 11-KT was lower in comparison to wild type males and sterile males, while E2 was higher when compared to wild type males. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the liver transcript profile of sterile adult males was similar to wild type males while the brain transcript profile was similar to wild type females. The results demonstrate that proper testis development may not be a prerequisite for male brain development in zebrafish but that it may be needed to fully masculinize the brain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2018. Vol. 265, no SI, p. 15-21
Keywords [en]
Dimorphism, Gonads, Reproduction, Sex differentiation, Steroid hormone
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68509DOI: 10.1016/j.ygcen.2018.02.001ISI: 000442712600003PubMedID: 29408375Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044373533OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-68509DiVA, id: diva2:1239570
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agency:

Örebro University 

Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Pradhan, AjayOlsson, Per-Erik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pradhan, AjayOlsson, Per-Erik
By organisation
School of Science and Technology
In the same journal
General and Comparative Endocrinology
Developmental Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 428 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf