oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
On the fetish-character in DAWS and the marketing of composition
MIAM - Center for Advanced Studies in Music, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6622-8890
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Before twentieth century, in the times when the composer had only pen and paper for writing music, music composition had long been considered as a production of the creative genius only. In the last century, the term composer has had new meanings with emerging technologies. Recently, it has reached to a level that every computer owner could have the chance of becoming a composer with the new title of producer, and in this process of change, music software has well been accepted as a tool for the democratization of composing. However, my paper takes this change of meaning in hand with a reversed approach.

Drawing on the recent research on indie culture’s consuming practices and the recent research on music technology press, also with references to Marx’s concept of commodity fetishism, Adorno’s arguments on the fetish-character in music, Bourdieu’s theory of social distinction, and Boulez’s comments on the technology and the composer, my paper argues that, within the spread of amateur level use of music software, the act of composing music has turned into means of self-presentation. My research indicates that the recent change in the meaning of the term composer has been indoctrinated to amateur music software users through a process of fetishism instead of a process of democratization. In this sense, I discuss that, through this influence exerted by the companies, the feeling of acting as a composer gets ahead of the aim of music making itself among amateur users, and concordantly, those users turn into customers rather than fellow users while music software becomes an object of desire for them. Methodologically, my paper centers upon the marketing strategies of software companies Image-Line and Ableton. My research is mainly based on comparative analyses of FL Studio’s and Ableton Live’s user-friendly interfaces, programs’ promotion in written and social media, and their user forums (Looptalk and Ableton Community).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
Keywords [en]
music sociology, digital culture, amateur music-making, music technology, music marketing
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68722OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-68722DiVA, id: diva2:1245225
Conference
II Congreso Internacional Música y Cultura Audiovisual MUCA, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain, January 22-24, 2015
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Canalp, Safa

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Canalp, Safa
Musicology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 167 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf