oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
High HMGB1 levels in sputum are related to pneumococcal bacteraemia but not to disease severity in community-acquired pneumonia
Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Infectious Diseases.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8730-6955
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Center for Infectious Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 13428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During bacterial infections, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activate immune cells. Here, we investigated whether plasma and sputum levels of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), a prototypic DAMP, are associated with disease severity and aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In addition, in patients with pneumococcal CAP, the impact of the level of sputum lytA DNA load, a PAMP, was investigated. We studied patients hospitalised for bacterial CAP (n = 111), and samples were collected at admission. HMGB1 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and pneumococcal lytA DNA load was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Plasma and sputum HMGB1 levels did not correlate to disease severity (pneumonia severity index or presence of sepsis), but high sputum HMGB1 level was correlated to pneumococcal aetiology (p = 0.002). In pneumococcal pneumonia, high sputum lytA DNA load was associated with respiratory failure (low PaO2/FiO2 ratio; p = 0.019), and high sputum HMGB1 level was associated with bacteraemia (p = 0.006). To conclude, high sputum HMGB1 was not associated with severe disease, but with pneumococcal bacteraemia, indicating a potential role for HMGB1 in bacterial dissemination. High sputum lytA was associated with severe disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018. Vol. 8, no 1, article id 13428
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68798DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31504-4ISI: 000444022800032PubMedID: 30194360Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052989231OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-68798DiVA, id: diva2:1246700
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Athlin, Simon

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Athlin, Simon
By organisation
School of Medical SciencesÖrebro University Hospital
In the same journal
Scientific Reports
Infectious Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 309 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf