oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Measuring risk aversion to guide transportation policy: Contexts, incentives, and respondents
Research Centre for Integrated Transport Innovation (rCITI), School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Australia.
Atkins North America, Denver, United States.
Applied Microeconomics, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics, Denmark.
Dean's Behavioral Economics Laboratory, J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Department of Economics, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, United States; Department of Economics, University of Cape Town, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8616-3318
2015 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 80, p. 15-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Road pricing may provide a solution to increasing traffic congestion in metropolitan areas. Route, departure time and travel mode choices depend on risk attitudes as commuters perceive the options as having uncertain effects on travel times. We propose that Experimental Economics methods can deliver data that uses real consequences and where the context can be varied by the researcher. The approach relies on the controlled manipulation of contexts, similar to what is done in the Stated Choice approach, but builds in actual consequences, similar to the Revealed Preference approach. This paper investigates some of the trade-offs between the cost of conducting Experimental Economics studies and the behavioral responses elicited. In particular, we compare responses to traditional lottery choice tasks to the route choice tasks in simulated driving environments. We also compare students (a low cost convenient participant pool) to field participants recruited from the driving population. While we see initial differences across our treatment groups, we find that their risk taking behavior converge with minimal repetition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 80, p. 15-34
Keywords [en]
Congestion pricing, Risk attitudes, Contextual tasks, Experiments, Driving simulations
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-68844DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2015.07.002ISI: 000362607200002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84938118642OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-68844DiVA, id: diva2:1247325
Note

Funding Agency:

Federal Highway Administration  DTFH61-09-H-00012

Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Rutström, Elisabet

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Rutström, Elisabet
In the same journal
Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice
Economics and Business

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 96 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf