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Sex of older siblings and stress resilience
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University College London, London, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6328-5494
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5996-2584
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2018 (English)In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 447-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate whether older siblings are associated with development of stress resilience in adolescence and if there are differences by sex of siblings. The study used a Swedish register-based cohort of men (n=664 603) born between 1970 and 1992 who undertook military conscription assessments in adolescence that included a measure of stress resilience: associations were assessed using multinomial logistic regression. Adjusted relative risk ratios (95% confidence intervals) for low stress resilience (n=136 746) compared with high (n=142 581) are 1.33 (1.30, 1.35), 1.65 (1.59, 1.71) and 2.36 (2.18, 2.54) for one, two and three or more male older siblings, compared with none. Equivalent values for female older siblings do not have overlapping confidence intervals with males and are 1.19 (1.17, 1.21), 1.46 (1.40, 1.51) and 1.87 (1.73, 2.03). When the individual male and female siblings are compared directly (one male sibling compared with one female sibling, etc.) and after adjustment, including for cognitive function, there is a statistically significant (p<0.005) greater risk for low stress resilience associated with male siblings. Older male siblings may have greater adverse implications for psychological development, perhaps due to greater demands on familial resources or inter-sibling interactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies , 2018. Vol. 9, no 4, p. 447-455
Keywords [en]
siblings, sex, psychological functioning, stress resilience, adolescence
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69976DOI: 10.14301/llcs.v9i4.486ISI: 000458728800005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85061810166OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-69976DiVA, id: diva2:1260294
Note

Funding Agencies:

Nyckelfonden  

UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)  RES-596-28-0001  ES/JO19119/1 

Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Montgomery, ScottBergh, CeciliaUdumyan, RuzanEriksson, MatsFall, KatjaHiyoshi, Ayako

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Montgomery, ScottBergh, CeciliaUdumyan, RuzanEriksson, MatsFall, KatjaHiyoshi, Ayako
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School of Medical SciencesÖrebro University HospitalSchool of Health Sciences
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Longitudinal and life course studies
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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