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All in the family: Within-family differences in parental monitoring and adolescent information management
Department of Psychology, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH, USA.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6879-3022
2019 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 390-402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article used a sample of 2 adolescents per family to (a) examine the extent to which parental monitoring and adolescent information management are characteristics of families or of dyads and (b) replicate past research on parental monitoring and adolescent information management using models that distinguish differences between families from differences within them. Within- and between-family differences were examined as a function of parents (positive and negative parenting, immigration status), individual and peer-reported problem behavior, and adolescent characteristics (age, gender) in a sample of 300 Swedish families with 2 siblings each (aged 10 to 19). Parents' self-reports of their monitoring of siblings and of their adolescents' information management were consistently more similar than adolescents' self-reports or reports on parents. Siblings' reports of parental monitoring and self-reports of routine and personal information management were modestly related to one another. Reports of secrecy, however, were statistically independent. Results predicting between-sibling differences are consistent with those obtained from longitudinal studies of one sibling per family: adolescents who engage in problem behavior are more secretive and disclose less information to parents. Their parents report them to be more secretive. Siblings who engage in delinquency report lower parent solicitation and control. Siblings' reports of both positive and negative parenting were associated with within-family differences in parental monitoring and their own information management. The results reinforce previous findings on the important role adolescents play in their own socialization. Differences between adolescent and parent reports highlight important methodological biases that may obscure key processes in family communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2019. Vol. 55, no 2, p. 390-402
Keywords [en]
adolescent, sibling, parental monitoring, information management, disclosure
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70353DOI: 10.1037/dev0000641ISI: 000456730200014PubMedID: 30474998Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057247010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-70353DiVA, id: diva2:1266399
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 345-2001-6661 421-2003-1522Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved

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Tilton-Weaver, Lauree

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other locale
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