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Coming to know about the body in Human Movement Studies programmes
School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3572-4976
School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
2016 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1003-1017Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores how a group of undergraduate Human Movement Studies (HMS) students learnt to know about the body during their four-year academic programme at an Australian university. When students begin an undergraduate programme in HMS they bring with them particular constructions, ideas and beliefs about their own bodies and about the body in general. Those ideas and beliefs are often challenged, disrupted or reinforced according to discourses and practices to which students are exposed and which they experience throughout their programme of study. The courses that these students take in their in HMS degree programme present to them different perspectives about health and the body. Some perspectives take the status of taken-for-granted truths and others are dismissed or ignored. Taking a Foucauldian perspective, this paper explores the dominant discourses and practices to which this group of students was exposed during their four years of academic formation, and the influences that this exposure might have upon their construction of the body and their formation as pre-service Health and Physical Education (HPE) teachers. The participants in this study were 14 students, 11 females and 3 males, aged between 18 and 26 at the time of the first interview. The data used for this paper were taken from a larger study and were analysed using a content analysis approach. Results suggest that some students may be heavily influenced by certain practices and discourses during their programme of studies, and that they embody dominant discourses of health. Furthermore, a possible change of thinking may occur across their academic programme, as a consequence of their engagement with a few alternative discourses presented during their academic programme, disrupting some of their previous beliefs and knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016. Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1003-1017
Keywords [en]
Body, Human Movement Studies, Undergraduate students, Discourse, Biopower
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70828DOI: 10.1080/13573322.2014.979144ISI: 000382494300003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84921935335OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-70828DiVA, id: diva2:1273089
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • vancouver
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Language
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Output format
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