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Physiological demands of standing and wheelchair fencing in able-bodied fencers
Barcelona Sports Sciences Research Group, National Institute of Physical Education of Catalonia (INEFC ), University of Barcelona, Barceöona, Spain.
Barcelona Sports Sciences Research Group, National Institute of Physical Education of Catalonia (INEFC ), University of Barcelona, Barceöona, Spain.
2Social and Educational Research Group of Physical Activity and Sports (GISEAFE ), National Institute of Physical Education of Catalonia (INEFC ), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
3School of Life and Medical Science, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 569-574Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine the cardiorespiratory demands of standing and wheelchair (seated) fencing in a group of able-bodied fencers during simulated competitive bouts.

METHODS: Participants were ten male able-bodied fencers of regional level with previous training experience in wheelchair fencing. After a standardised warm-up participants performed two series of simulated competitive épée bouts (5 and 15 touches) in a random order, either while standing or while sitting in a wheelchair. Expired gas was analyzed for oxygen consumption (V̇ O2) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and heart rate were continually monitored. Energy expenditure (EE) was subsequently calculated.

RESULTS: V̇ O2, HR and EE peak responses were greater during standing than seated fencing (p< .05). Mean V̇ O2 during all ST bouts (5 and 15 touch) was 43% greater than in WC fencing (44.2 ± 7.8 vs. 25.1 ± 5.4 ml·kg-1·min-1). Mean HR during the standing 5 and 15 touch bouts was 91% ± 20% and 84% ± 7% of that recorded during the seated bouts. HR,V̇O2 and EE data also indicated that the 15-touch bouts were more physiologically demanding than the 5-touch bouts (P < .01). The HR-V̇ O2 relationship was similar between both fencing modes. The duration of the 5 and 15 touch bouts were shorter for the seated than the standing bouts (P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS: The physiological demands of wheelchair fencing are lower than those for standing fencing. Furthermore, the physiology of 5 vs. 15 touch bouts, similar to those undertaken in fencing competition, also differs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edizioni Minerva Medica , 2019. Vol. 59, no 4, p. 569-574
Keywords [en]
Adapted sport, Heart rate, Oxygen consumption, Energyexpenditure, Paralympic sport
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71330DOI: 10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08413-XISI: 000463022700005PubMedID: 29722255Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85063959297OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-71330DiVA, id: diva2:1278459
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Rodríguez-Zamora, Lara

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