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Smelling Nano Aerial Vehicle for Gas Source Localization and Mapping
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Baldiri Reixac, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Electronics and Biomedical Engineering, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. (Department of Electronic and Biomedical Engineering / Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC))
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (AASS MRO Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5061-5474
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (AASS MRO Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0217-9326
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Baldiri Reixac, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Electronics and Biomedical Engineering, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. (Department of Electronic and Biomedical Engineering / Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC))ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2663-2965
2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 3, article id 478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the development and validation of the currently smallest aerial platform with olfaction capabilities. The developed Smelling Nano Aerial Vehicle (SNAV) is based on a lightweight commercial nano-quadcopter (27 g) equipped with a custom gas sensing board that can host up to two in situ metal oxide semiconductor (MOX) gas sensors. Due to its small form-factor, the SNAV is not a hazard for humans, enabling its use in public areas or inside buildings. It can autonomously carry out gas sensing missions of hazardous environments inaccessible to terrestrial robots and bigger drones, for example searching for victims and hazardous gas leaks inside pockets that form within the wreckage of collapsed buildings in the aftermath of an earthquake or explosion. The first contribution of this work is assessing the impact of the nano-propellers on the MOX sensor signals at different distances to a gas source. A second contribution is adapting the ‘bout’ detection algorithm, proposed by Schmuker et al. (2016) to extract specific features from the derivative of the MOX sensor response, for real-time operation. The third and main contribution is the experimental validation of the SNAV for gas source localization (GSL) and mapping in a large indoor environment (160 m2) with a gas source placed in challenging positions for the drone, for example hidden in the ceiling of the room or inside a power outlet box. Two GSL strategies are compared, one based on the instantaneous gas sensor response and the other one based on the bout frequency. From the measurements collected (in motion) along a predefined sweeping path we built (in less than 3 min) a 3D map of the gas distribution and identified the most likely source location. Using the bout frequency yielded on average a higher localization accuracy than using the instantaneous gas sensor response (1.38 m versus 2.05 m error), however accurate tuning of an additional parameter (the noise threshold) is required in the former case. The main conclusion of this paper is that a nano-drone has the potential to perform gas sensing tasks in complex environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2019. Vol. 19, no 3, article id 478
Keywords [en]
Robotics, signal processing, electronics, gas source localization, gas distribution mapping; gas sensors, drone, UAV, MOX sensor, quadcopter
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
Computer Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-71963DOI: 10.3390/s19030478ISI: 000459941200041PubMedID: 30682827Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85060510907OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-71963DiVA, id: diva2:1284132
Note

Funding Agency:

Spanish MINECO  BES-2015-071698  TEC2014-59229-R

Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Smelling Nano Aerial Vehicle for Gas Source Localization and Mapping(21775 kB)20 downloads
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Hernandez Bennetts, VictorLilienthal, Achim

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