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Sleep apnea and Down's syndrome
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
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2003 (English)In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 123, no 9, p. 1094-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea has been reported to occur in 20-50% of children with Down's syndrome in case series of patients referred for evaluation of suspected sleep apnea. In this population-based controlled study, we aimed to investigate whether sleep apnea is related to Down's syndrome.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Every child aged 2-10 years with Down's syndrome residing in the Umeå healthcare district (n = 28) was invited to participate in the study, with their siblings acting as controls. Successful overnight sleep apnea recordings and echocardiography were performed in 17/21 children with Down's syndrome and in 21 controls.

RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea could not be diagnosed, either in children with Down's syndrome or in the control children. The apnea-hypopnea index in the children with Down's syndrome was 1.2 +/- 1.5 and did not differ from that in controls. Snoring and hypertrophy of the tonsils were more common in children with Down's syndrome than in controls. Children with Down's syndrome slept for a shorter time (p < 0.001) and changed body position more often (p < 0.05) than the control children.

CONCLUSIONS: Snoring, restless sleep and hypertrophy of the tonsils were common among children with Down's syndrome. Obstructive sleep apnea was, however, not related to Down's syndrome in the present population-based controlled study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2003. Vol. 123, no 9, p. 1094-7
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72261DOI: 10.1080/00016480310015362ISI: 000187550600015PubMedID: 14710914Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0346249812OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-72261DiVA, id: diva2:1286679
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved

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Rask, Eva

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