oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than solar UV radiation
Plant Biology Division, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, , Helsinki, Finland.
Valoya Ltd, , Helsinki, Finland.
Viikki Metabolomics Unit, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, , Helsinki, Finland.
Plant Biology Division, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, , Helsinki, Finland. (Molecular Biochemistry)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9233-7254
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 941-952Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV‐A and UV‐B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV‐B; (2) attenuate UV‐B and UV‐A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV‐B and UV‐A; (4) attenuate UV‐B, UV‐A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole‐leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV‐B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV‐A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV‐B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2015. Vol. 38, no 5, p. 941-952
Keywords [en]
growth, kaempferol, phenolic compounds, quercetin, solar radiation
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72402DOI: 10.1111/pce.12403ISI: 000353898400009PubMedID: 25040832Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84927715964OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-72402DiVA, id: diva2:1288044
Funder
Academy of Finland, 252548, 266523
Note

Funding agencies:

Suomen Biologian Seura Vanamo

Societas pro Fauna et Flora Fennica

Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Morales, Luis Orlando

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Morales, Luis Orlando
In the same journal
Plant, Cell and Environment
Botany

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 52 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf