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Closing the Gap: Experienced Simulation Educators' Role and Impact on Everyday Health care
Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Institute of Medicine and Health, Medical Faculty, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
Clinical Skills Center, Center for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västeras, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Learning, Informatics, Management, and Ethics and Department of Clinical Science and Education, So¨dersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, ISSN 0894-1912, E-ISSN 1554-558X, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Trained simulation educators (SEs) usually work both at simulation centers and in everyday health care, and thus, they possess dual expertise. Experienced SEs are known to grow confident with their expanding experience, but evidence is scarce about how this affects their development as clinical professionals. The aim of this study was to explore how experienced SEs describe their role within the context of everyday health care.

METHODS: An explorative descriptive study including 14 semistructured interviews and 27 questionnaires was conducted with 41 experienced SEs. An inductive thematic analysis was used to identify and analyze patterns describing SEs' perceptions of the influence of their educational work on everyday health care.

RESULTS: The SEs' descriptions of their encounters during everyday clinical work, which were affected by the fact that they had experience of facilitating simulation training, were gathered into three main themes with three of their own subthemes: education (educational needs, routines/guidelines, and being a resource), nontechnical skills (communication, feedback, and leadership/coworkership), and clinical proficiency (situational insight, role model, and confidence in clinical practice). The insights gained and actions taken as clinical professionals are all intended to be implemented with the ultimate aim of safe patient care.

DISCUSSION: All the aspects of the SEs' work are perceived to be successfully translated into clinical practice and can be summarized by the main themes of education, nontechnical skills, and clinical proficiency as delineated by this study. These themes are demonstrated at the individual, team, and organizational levels through increased competence and confidence.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019. Vol. 39, no 1, p. 36-41
Keywords [en]
Simulation educator, medical simulation, continuing medical education, patient safety, knowledge translation
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Nursing
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72789DOI: 10.1097/CEH.0000000000000240PubMedID: 30768445Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85062407899OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-72789DiVA, id: diva2:1293287
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved

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Allvin, Renée

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