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Constructive readings of interactive episodes: Examining ethics in physical education from a social constructionist perspective
Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3918-7904
Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
2013 (English)In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 511-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we illustrate how ways of thinking about ethics are tied up with sport and physical education practice and introduce an alternative approach that can help to develop ethical pedagogies. We begin by locating socio-moral education in physical education within historical and contemporary pedagogical scholarship. Our argument is that the work of today's physical educators is still shaped by claims that were made about school sport in the nineteenth century and that sport scholars have long had difficulties proving these claims empirically. Rather than search for data that can confirm or refute claims of moral learning, we examine how incidents related to moral behaviour occur during physical education lessons. To do this we draw on data from an ethnographic investigation of a school in North Western Switzerland. Specifically, we present three episodes of interaction in three different physical education lessons. To make sense of these episodes, we introduce a social constructionist perspective. The main assumptions of this perspective are: (1) meanings are created through dialogue and consensus and are context-relative; (2) interactions between people are joint accomplishments; and (3) contexts affect how people interact with one another. Equipped with a constructionist framework, we then inspect the interactive episodes more closely. We include brief discussions of how constructionist understandings might inform ethics pedagogies in the future, suggesting that practitioners should be cautious of universal understandings of ethics, consider pupils as members of communities that are held together by shared practices, provide space for pupils to position themselves differently during lessons and, finally, account for contextual factors when evaluating pupils' actions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2013. Vol. 18, no 4, p. 511-526
Keywords [en]
Community, Critical incident, Ethnography, Interaction, Language, Moral, Rules
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73079DOI: 10.1080/13573322.2011.601290ISI: 000320083400005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84878989617OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-73079DiVA, id: diva2:1295098
Available from: 2019-03-10 Created: 2019-03-10 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved

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Barker-Ruchti, Natalie

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