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Sport-'It's Just Healthy': Locating Healthism within Discourses of Social Integration
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3918-7904
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Institute of Cultural Studies, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland.
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2013 (English)In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 759-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immigration discourses in Switzerland have developed out of a fear of 'over-foreignisation'. Central to this development are discourses of difference in which Swiss culture is centred and foreign ones are marginalised. At present, Eastern and South-East European cultures are particularly affected. In this article, we challenge perceived cultural incommensurability by examining the socialisation of second-generation girls of immigrant background, through data generated from semi-structured interviews with them. The girls draw on a tightly defined discursive range of linguistic resources to construct the meanings of sport, health and the body. Specifically, the girls refer to healthism, within which sport is seen to provide a means to achieve good health and a slim and feminine body. These references reflect a set of knowledge and discourses important to Western cultures. Alternative discursive resources exist, yet were not utilised. We argue that the girls' adoption of healthist ideas is used to counter cultural narratives-such as the uncultured, and thus non-integrated, immigrant-and that this adoption supports and maintains white healthist ideas, 'othering' the (foreign) other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2013. Vol. 39, no 5, p. 759-772
Keywords [en]
Healthism, Normalisation, Second-Generation Girls of Immigrant Background, Social Integration, Switzerland, acculturation, cultural relations, health status, immigrant population, international migration, marginalization, womens status
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73080DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2013.756674ISI: 000316654600005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84875806360OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-73080DiVA, id: diva2:1295099
Available from: 2019-03-10 Created: 2019-03-10 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved

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Barker-Ruchti, Natalie

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