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“Gymnasts Are Like Wine, They Get Better With Age”: Becoming and Developing Adult Women’s Artistic Gymnasts
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Tourism, Sport and Society, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3918-7904
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Tourism, Sport and Society, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
School of Humanities, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
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2017 (English)In: Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), ISSN 0033-6297, E-ISSN 1543-2750, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 348-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women’s artistic gymnastics is commonly understood to require early entrance and intense training during childhood. Most gymnasts retire before reaching adulthood. In recent years, the gymnast population at the highest level has “aged.” In this article, we adopt a socio-pedagogical perspective to explore the training contexts, pubertal development, and associated learning 10 older elite gymnasts reported. We develop a cultural perspective of gymnast development and show that transitioning through puberty allowed the gymnasts to extend their careers. Support from their coaches and parents, self-reflective time, and genetic predispositions facilitated the transitioning. Through this, gymnasts gained control over self, body, relationships, and performance. In conclusion, we provide implications for gymnast development practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017. Vol. 69, no 3, p. 348-365
Keywords [en]
Athlete development, cultural perspective of learning, horizons for action, horizons of learning, puberty as career transition phase
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73060DOI: 10.1080/00336297.2016.1230504ISI: 000415001800004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84992530604OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-73060DiVA, id: diva2:1295117
Available from: 2019-03-10 Created: 2019-03-10 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved

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Barker-Ruchti, Natalie

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf