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The intention to make preconception lifestyle changes in men: Associated socio-demographic and psychosocial factors
University Centre for Nursing & Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
University Centre for Nursing & Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Science, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3080-8716
University Centre for Nursing & Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; VIVES University College, Department Health Care, Roeselare, Belgium.
2018 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 73, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To determine which socio-demographic and psychosocial factors are associated with the intention for preconception healthily behavioral changes in the general population of reproductive-aged men.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional, multicenter study.

SETTING: Four secondary schools, 4 Public Centers for Social Welfare, 7 Community Health Centers, and online. All data was collected in the X.

PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 304 reproductive-aged men were recruited between July 2015 and July 2016.

MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: An existing questionnaire was adapted and validated to assess the intention, self-efficacy, attitude, social influence, knowledge, and barriers towards 10 preconception health behaviors. Simple and multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. The overall intention to make preconception lifestyle changes was high (median score: 0.7 on the 0-1 scale). The multiple linear regression revealed that self-efficacy (p < 0.001), social influence of the close social environment (p = 0.02), and attitude (p = 0.05) were associated with a higher intention score. Experiencing negative emotions and beliefs about pre-pregnancy preparations was associated with less intention for preconception health behaviors (p = 0.001). None of the socio-demographic factors was significantly associated with the intention score.

KEY CONCLUSIONS: The overall intention to make preconception lifestyle changes was high, and associated with different psychosocial factors including self-efficacy, social influence, and attitude.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Preconception interventions should target the identified factors to improve preconception health behaviors in men and negative emotions and beliefs about preconception. Interventions about preconception health care should primarily suggest that men bear the same responsibility as women, which will address the current gender politics and could have -in second instance- a positive outcome on pregnancy outcomes. Because socio-demographic characteristics were of no influence, a general approach should be used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018. Vol. 73, p. 8-16
Keywords [en]
ASE model, Associated factors, Behavior and behavior mechanisms, Intention, Men, Preconception behavior
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73154DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2018.12.006ISI: 000463163100002PubMedID: 30831318Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85062304076OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-73154DiVA, id: diva2:1296476
Note

Funding Agency:

Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO)  G058113N

Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved

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Beeckman, Dimitri

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