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Testing Bidirectional Associations Between Childhood Aggression and BMI: Results from Three Cohorts
Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Generation R Study Group, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Generation R Study Group, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
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2019 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 822-829Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the prospective, potentially bidirectional association of aggressive behavior with BMI and body composition across childhood in three population-based cohorts.

METHODS: Repeated measures of aggression and BMI were available from the Generation R Study between ages 6 and 10 years (N = 3,974), the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR) between ages 7 and 10 years (N = 10,328), and the Swedish Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development (TCHAD) between ages 9 and 14 years (N = 1,462). In all samples, aggression was assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist. Fat mass and fat-free mass were available in the Generation R Study. Associations were examined with cross-lagged modeling.

RESULTS: Aggressive behavior at baseline was associated with higher BMI at follow-up in the Generation R Study (β = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.04), in NTR (β = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.06), and in TCHAD (β = 0.03, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.07). Aggressive behavior was prospectively associated with higher fat mass (β = 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.05) but not fat-free mass. There was no evidence that BMI or body composition preceded aggressive behavior.

CONCLUSIONS: More aggressive behavior was prospectively associated with higher BMI and fat mass. This suggests that aggression contributes to the obesity problem, and future research should study whether these behavioral pathways to childhood obesity are modifiable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019. Vol. 27, no 5, p. 822-829
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73659DOI: 10.1002/oby.22419ISI: 000465255700017PubMedID: 30957987Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064912520OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-73659DiVA, id: diva2:1304199
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council
Note

Funding Agencies:

European Union Seventh Framework Program (2007-2013): Aggression in Children: Unravelling Gene-Environment Interplay to Inform Treatment and Intervention Strategies (ACTION)  602768 

Dutch Diabetes Foundation  2013.81.1664 

Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)  016. VICI.170.200 

Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam  

Erasmus University, Rotterdam  

Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw)  

NWO  NWO 480-04-004  ZonMw 912-10-020  NWO 480-15-001 

Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, Henrik

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