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Nutritional Intake in Elite Cross-Country Skiers During Two Days of Training and Competition
Mid Sweden University, Sweden; Deakin University, Geelong, Australia.
Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, ISSN 1526-484X, E-ISSN 1543-2742, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the energy, macronutrient, and fluid intakes, as well as hydration status (urine specific gravity), in elite cross-country skiers during a typical day of training (Day 1) and a sprint skiing competition the following day (Day 2). A total of 31 (18 males and 13 females) national team skiers recorded their food and fluid intakes and urine specific gravity was measured on Days 1 and 2. In addition, the females completed the Low Energy Availability in Females Questionnaire to assess their risk of long-term energy deficiency. Energy intake for males was 65 +/- 9 kcal/kg on Day 1 versus 58 +/- 9 kcal/kg on Day 2 (p = .002) and for females was 57 +/- 10 on Day 1 versus 55 +/- 5 kcal/kg on Day 2 (p = .445). Carbohydrate intake recommendations of 10-12 g.kg(-l) .day(-1) were not met by 89% of males and 92% of females. All males and females had a protein intake above the recommended 1.2-2.0 g/kg on both days and a postexercise protein intake above the recommended 0.3 g/kg. Of the females, 31% were classified as being at risk of long-term energy deficiency. In the morning of Day 1, 50% of males and 46% of females were dehydrated; on Day 2, this was the case for 56% of males and 38% of females. In conclusion, these data suggest that elite cross-country skiers ingested more protein and less carbohydrate than recommended and one third of the females were considered at risk of long-term energy deficiency. Furthermore, many of the athletes were dehydrated prior to training and competition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2019. Vol. 29, no 3, p. 273-281
Keywords [en]
Carbohydrate, energy deficiency, hydration status, protein, winter sports
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74226DOI: 10.1123/ijsnem.2017-0411ISI: 000466708800005PubMedID: 29989466Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85065593387OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-74226DiVA, id: diva2:1314792
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved

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