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Hope and Technology: Other-Oriented Hope Related to Eye Gaze Technology for Children with Severe Disabilities
Division of Nursing Science, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Occupational Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 10, article id E1667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introducing advanced assistive technology such as eye gaze controlled computers can improve a person's quality of life and awaken hope for a child's future inclusion and opportunities in society. This article explores the meanings of parents' and teachers' other-oriented hope related to eye gaze technology for children with severe disabilities. A secondary analysis of six parents' and five teachers' interview transcripts was conducted in accordance with a phenomenological-hermeneutic research method. The eye gaze controlled computer creates new imaginations of a brighter future for the child, but also becomes a source for motivation and action in the present. The other-oriented hope occurs not just in the future; it is already there in the present and opens up new alternatives and possibilities to overcome the difficulties the child is encountering today. Both the present situation and the hope for the future influence each other, and both affect the motivation for using the technology. This emphasises the importance of clinicians giving people opportunities to express how they see the future and how technology could realise this hope.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. Vol. 16, no 10, article id E1667
Keywords [en]
Disabled children, eye gaze control technology, phenomenological-hermeneutic, self-help devices, technology
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74323DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16101667ISI: 000470967500001PubMedID: 31091645Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85066865039OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-74323DiVA, id: diva2:1316686
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-07-23Bibliographically approved

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Borgestig, Maria

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
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  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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