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Implementation of Early Intervention Protocol in Australia for 'High Risk' Injured Workers is Associated with Fewer Lost Work Days Over 2 Years Than Usual (Stepped) Care
Sydney Medical School - Northern, University of Sydney & Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.
Sydney Medical School - Northern, University of Sydney & Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Health And Medical Psychology)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5359-0452
Arthritis Care UK Primary Care Centre, Keele University, Keele, North Staffordshire, UK.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose To evaluate whether a protocol for early intervention addressing the psychosocial risk factors for delayed return to work in workers with soft tissue injuries would achieve better long-term outcomes than usual (stepped) care. Methods The study used a controlled, non-randomised prospective design to compare two case management approaches. For the intervention condition, workers screened within 1-3 weeks of injury as being at high risk of delayed returned to work by the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire-short version (ÖMPSQ-SF) were offered psychological assessment and a comprehensive protocol to address the identified obstacles for return to work. Similarly identified injured workers in the control condition were managed under usual (stepped) care arrangements. Results At 2-year follow-up, the mean lost work days for the Intervention group was less than half that of the usual care group, their claim costs were 30% lower, as was the growth trajectory of their costs after 11 months. Conclusions The findings supported the hypothesis that brief psychological risk factor screening, combined with a protocol for active collaboration between key stakeholders to address identified psychological and workplace factors for delayed return to work, can achieve better return on investment than usual (stepped) care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Early intervention, Psychosocial factors, Screening, Work injury, Workers’ compensation
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75572DOI: 10.1007/s10926-019-09849-yPubMedID: 31346923OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-75572DiVA, id: diva2:1341655
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved

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Linton, Steven J.

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